ISO/IEC 19770-3 Quick Guide; leveraging -3 tags in contract negotiations

ISO/IEC 19770-3 Entitlement tags - when software entitlement can be read and processed by machines (Lower cost, less admin, more clarity)

ISO/IEC 19770-3 Entitlement tags – when software entitlement can be read and processed by machines (Lower cost, less admin, more clarity)

In this podcast I speak with Jason Keogh of 1E, Editor of the ISO/IEC 19770-3 Standard to give us an update on -3.

The new standard was published in April 2016, so what does it mean to ITAM and how can we make use of it?

What is -3?

From Wikipedia:

“(-3)…provides a technical definition of an XML schema that can encapsulate the details of software entitlements, including usage rights, limitations and metrics.

The primary intentions of 19770-3 are:

  1. To provide a basis for common terminology to be used when describing entitlement rights, limitations and metrics
  2. To provide a schema which allows effective description of rights, limitations and metrics attaching to a software license.”

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO/IEC_19770

In summary, -3 tags are machine readable entitlement. Which means lower cost, less admin and more clarity around licensing.

Jason provides an overview of how -3 tags can be used and why every organization should be insisting, via RFPs, that their software publishers should include -3 tags. Jason argues that the provision of -3 entitlement tags can be a useful discussion point and bargaining chip in software contract negotiations.

This podcast is also available as a video below.

Podcast Episode 27

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One Comment

  1. John Tomeny says:

    A great job from Jason Keogh on describing the purpose and primary benefits of ISO/IEC 19770-3 Entitlement tags (“ENT”). Thanks Jason for the clarity you presented here and for picking up the effort and completing our work for publication. Since the moment I convened the working group at the end of 2008, and throughout the development process in the years since, there has been one laser sharp vision of purpose: “to digitally encapsulate the details of software entitlements, including usage rights, limitations and metrics”.

    As Jason points out, when this standard is adopted by software publishers and used to transmit detailed entitlement rights, limitations and metrics (the definitive measures of compliance), it will lower the cost of SAM, help reduce the incidents of non-compliance, and bring clarity to license optimization efforts.

    Even when software publishers resist adoption, there still remains a benefit; increased leverage in the hands of the buyer to negotiate more favorable audit clauses and other concessions. To the many people who have contributed to this effort; thank you!

    So that everyone can appreciate the breadth of effort from so many industry professionals that went into building 19770-3, here are the contributors of whom I am aware – most of whom worked during my Convenership. Charles Ansell, Krzysztof Baczkiewicz, Mathieu Baissac, Kris Barker, Mary Barr, David Bicket, Doc Burnham, Pat Cicala, Roger Cummings, Christine Eichhold, Pat Fetty, John Fulton, Karen Grunebach, Mika Harviala, Sherry Irwin, Jason Keogh, Steve Klos, Ken Lippe, Steve Mullins, John Richardson, Venkatesh Somashekhar, Brian Turner, David Wright and Heather Young. If you were a contributor and I have not listed you, please forgive me and let me know so I can acknowledge your contribution as well.

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